An unexpected health care ruling leads to turmoil

  

Friday night’s ruling by a federal district judge in Texas v. Azar that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is unconstitutional has created fresh uncertainty in the U.S. health care system. While the ruling does not immediately impact the health law itself, it could potentially upend the American health care system in significant ways.

Members of Congress on both sides of the aisle immediately vowed to take steps that would retain the ACA’s protections for patients with pre-existing conditions and Essential Health Benefits (EHB) while the case continues to make its way through the legal system (experts widely believe that Friday’s decision will be appealed to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals and could ultimately reach the Supreme Court).

ANA’s official statement noted that “This ruling puts at risk access to quality, affordable, and accessible health care for the millions of Americans whose lives have improved due to the coverage expansions and consumer protections under the ACA.”

Incoming Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA) promised on Twitter that his committee would hold hearings on the ruling, and that he would work with Democrats to “strengthen” the ACA through legislation, while Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) said she was sure the ruling would be overturned and that “There is widespread support for protecting people with preexisting conditions.”

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) vowed to press for a vote on the Senate floor “urging an intervention in the case,” and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), widely expected to lead Democrats as Speaker in the 116th Congress, pledged to “move swiftly to formally intervene in the appeals process.”

President Trump indicated via Twitter that a potential Supreme Court ruling that upheld Friday’s decision would offer an opportunity to work in a bipartisan fashion “to deliver great health care.” He called on lawmakers to formulate and pass a replacement for the ACA, despite the limited success of previous efforts to do so.

Seema Verma, Administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), was quick to clarify via social media that the ruling would not adversely impact consumers who were still shopping for individual health insurance coverage during the Open Enrollment period that ended on Saturday, December 15th. In a formal statement, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) echoed this point, noting that “This decision does not require that HHS make any changes to any of the ACA programs it administers or its enforcement of any portion of the ACA at this time.”

The Texas v. Azar lawsuit was brought following the congressional repeal of the individual mandate in December 2017 as part of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. The Texas Attorney General, along with AGs in 19 other states, argued that this repeal eliminated the Supreme Court’s rationale for finding the individual mandate constitutional in the 2012 Supreme Court decision NFIB v. Sebelius. Though driven by these states, the focus will now shift to Congress, following an election cycle in which support for major provisions of the Affordable Care Act and health care in general were key campaign issues.

mm

Author: Matthew Fitting

Matthew Fitting is an Advocacy and Engagement Specialist with the American Nurses Association.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *